HOW FEE FISHING FITS IN THE OUTDOOR SCENE

HOW FEE FISHING FITS IN THE OUTDOOR SCENETo many the idea of fishing a fee pond is like fishing a swimming pool.  To them it is not even fishing.  To others fee fishing is a necessary addition to their fishing scene.  Who is correct? To some a fish raised in a hatchery on a diet of commercial food is no challenge.  Still others find it difficult to catch these same fish.

Fee lakes and ponds provide a place for new anglers to learn the skills necessary to take up the sport.  Others use such areas to sharpen skills and develop successful patterns.  It also can be a confidence builder to the novice.

Such lakes are popular with residents of larger metropolitan areas who might otherwise not be able to finds a place to fish close to home.

A close cousin of the pay lakes are those stocked by fish and wildlife agencies.  These can be in forest preserves, parks, reservoirs and private ponds.  The fish usually come from commercial hatcheries or state owned facilities.  Some come from the same hatcheries that sell to fee ponds.

Regardless of the type of fishery involved, stocked lakes are good locations to involve youngsters.  Kids lose interest if they do not catch fish.  Most of these lakes contain species such as trout, catfish and bluegills.  In most states the daily fishing areas do not require a fishing license.

The quality of this fishing experience is dependent upon the management of the water.  Some can be more challenging because some areas practice catch and release.  They seem smarter the second time around.

Those who want to learn from the experience of this fishing need to stop and examine the surroundings.  Where did the fish come from?  Why was he there?  What bait or lure di he prefer?  What is it about the bottom of the pond, vegetation, structure or water clarity that attracted the fish to this spot? Continue reading – https://dongasaway.wordpress.com/2015/04/12/how-fee-fishing-fits-in-the-outdoor-scene/

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